Introducing Leopold the Longarm

Leopold the Longarm, quite at home dominating my sewing room

Hello everyone!

As you may have seen on social media this weekend, I have some terribly exciting news! A generous quilter named Sally donated a Tin Lizzie 18 longarm to Quilts for Cure, and we picked it up and set it up on Saturday!

Close up of Leo with a practice piece/baby quilt loaded on the frame, ready for quilting

For those of you who don’t quilt, a long arm, sometimes called a “quilting machine,” is a large sewing machine set on a frame so as to quilt very efficiently. When quilting on a domestic (“normal”) sewing machine, you have to push and shove and scrunch the bulk of the quilt through the harp or throat (the space between the needle and the machine), and that slows things down a good bit (hence why I’m still quilting the #OperationSmiley quilts all these months later). With a longarm, the machine moves across the quilt, and it’s much faster.

Practicing stitches and motifs

This longarm, who I’m affectionately calling Leopold, is a game changer for Quilts for Cure. It will make it easier to complete quilts and get them out to kids in treatment. It will make it easier for me to test ideas for Quilt Alongs (like the one coming soon). And, if y’all are game, it might even give me the courage to tackle another #OperationSmiley next February.

Completed practice piece which will be a baby quilt for donation

I’ve been working hard on my machine quilting skills, so Sunday I put them through their paces to see how things translated into working on Leopold. I was so pleased with the results, that I’ve squared it up and will put a nice blue binding on it to make a baby boy quilt. Yesterday, I finished piecing #OperationSmiley quilt #8 and loaded it up. By george, I’m spoiled already– the whole thing was quilted in just an hour or so! I can’t wait to bind it, and get going on #9!

Operation Smiley Quilt #8

 

 

I hope y’all are as excited as I am! Thank you, Sally!!

ACTION ITEMS

  1. Make a Quilt to give to one of the 40,000 children in treatment for pediatric cancer in the United States
  2. Give money to Quilts for Cure so that we can make more quilts and contribute to research for a cure
  3. Spread the word with everyone you know about Quilts for Cure– share on your social media, with your quilt guild, etc.

Oh, and a quick update on Abri– Her family received the most marvelous news this weekend that she has NOT relapsed! It’s a bit complicated as to why the original test results were ┬ámisleading, but this is wonderful, wonderful news. As she is still facing several surgeries to repair her leg and replace the bone that Ewings Sarcoma destroyed, two fabulous quilters, Amy and Jen, are collaborating to make her a quilt to keep her cozy through the rest of her recovery.

More soon!

HollyAnne

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